Real People. Real Stories
Maiv H.

Maiv’s family deserves justice, but outdated trucking insurance laws have left her family facing the high cost of medical care and other losses from the crash that stole Maiv’s autonomy.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Richard E.

In 2008, a car accident left Richard with a serious cervical spine injury.  Emergency room physicians placed him in a cervical collar but never detected the injury and later ordered it removed.  The result was devastating.  Richard was paralyzed.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Ed C.

Ed worked as an operator and foreman at an Ethyl plant in Texas for forty years. Working there was a family affair- his dad helped build it and his son works there today. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
David S.

After serving in the Navy, David worked for 40 years at his family-run scrap yard. Part of his daily routine included beating insulation off the scrap metal, causing asbestos fibers to fill the air and his lungs. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
MetroLink

Victims of a 2008 California train crash, which left 25 dead and more than 100 injured, are still fighting for justice. It was California's worst train disaster ever.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Donald S.

Donald loved working as a career truck driver. He even took his wife and grandson with him on occasion, something his grandson always looked forward to.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Conor G.

Conor was an “A” student and elite swimmer,  on the way to earning a collegiate swimming scholarship.  In 2011 he was diagnosed with colitis—inflammation of the colon and large intestine—after taking Claravis, the generic version of Accutane, a drug used to treat acne.

 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Cami B.

If Cami was given a brand name drug, she would have had access to justice. 

A doctor placed Camille “Cami” Baruch on a generic version of the anti-acne drug Accutane when she was just 12.  The effect was devastating. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Davanna F.

It was a cold and snowy day in western Pennsylvania. The family minivan carrying 10 year-old Davanna was stopped at a red light. Without warning, the sound of a semi-truck’s horn pierced the air. But it was too late.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Avery D.

Avery was born with a hereditary heart defect that put her at risk for arrhythmia. Avery had Medtronic’s Sprint Fidelis defibrillator lead that was prone to fracture, causing unnecessary electrical shocks. The wire was later recalled. Avery’s justice was denied.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Katie M.

Millions of Americans trust their lives to medical devices but they may have no legal recourse if those devices fail.  When that happens, no one is held responsible.  There is no justice.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Michael T.

Every year, 440,000 Americans die as a result of preventable medical errors, and countless more are injured.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Krislyn S.

Krislyn was a healthy 27-year-old taking Zarah, the generic form of the popular birth control pill Yaz, when she became dizzy and fainted. She was rushed to the emergency room where she fainted again.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Debbie B.

Debbie graduated with a degree from a major university in Cellular Biology/Physiology. She wanted a career caring for people and decided to further her education so that she could become a surgical technician. Lamson College, a local school in Tempe, Ariz.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Merlyna A.

Those seeking to limit accountability in the civil justice system should meet Merlyna Adams.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Tia H.

When Tia began working for Circuit City, she never imagined that her supervisor and mentor would assault and sexually harass her. She also had no idea that there was a clause hidden in the fine print of the employment contract that would grant Circuit City a license to steal her access to justice.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Quanisha S.

Health care providers and hospitals should be accountable for the care they provide, or the care they should have provided. When lawmakers seek to limit their responsibility, it puts the safety of all of us at risk. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Linda M.

Every year, 440,000 Americans die as a result of preventable medical errors and many countless more are injured. States across America are considering legislation that would limit the rights of injured patients while providing no accountability for medical errors.

 
Real People. Real Stories
James M.

All James wanted was to fund his small business with a loan provided by a business partner.   Once the loan was authorized, the money would show up in James’ bank account - which he could then use to pay bills. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Terry O.

Terry began taking Reglan in 1998 for Acid Reflux. His pharmacist switched him to the generic version when it became available.  Despite the fact that Reglan was originally introduced for short-term use, Terry was prescribed the drug for more than 12 years.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Javier R.

It’s hard to imagine a group of Americans more deserving of our protection than the servicemen and women who protect our country.  Javier, an Army Reservist from Florida, is one of them. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Phillip C.

Part of Phillip’s job as a mechanic at an industrial chemical plant in Alabama consisted of repairing and refurbishing industrial machinery.  He did it for 35 years.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Blake F.

Anyone who seeks to limit accountability when Americans are killed by preventable medical errors should be aware of Blake’s story. Blake was a 19-year-old college student from Blacksburg, Virginia.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Lauren L.

Preventable medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Every year, 440,000 patients are killed by preventable medical errors in our country, and countless more are injured. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Karen B.

Simply because Karen’s prescription was filled with a generic drug, not a brand, her legal rights are now in doubt.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Carmelo R.

Sergeant Carmelo R. was a member of the Marine Corps, a father with a seven-year-old son, and even a part-time actor who once appeared on screen with actress Katie Holmes.  

 
Real People. Real Stories
Charles F.

While a college student, Charles spent his summers working at his dad’s warehouse stocking insulation products and cleaning up. Because of his familiarity with the product, he also helped with insulation prep and installation at various job sites.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Sophie H.

Sophie was in college working on her Environmental Studies degree, when she began taking two generic drugs prescribed to help clear her complexion. However, instead of a clear skin, Sophie experienced multiple pulmonary emboli and almost died. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Randy R.

Throughout his life, Randy worked multiple manufacturing jobs in both Tennessee and Georgia. During these years he was exposed to asbestos multiple times.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Stephen S.

The better part of a decade has passed since the Tea Fire in Santa Barbara County, California, burned 1,900 acres and destroyed 210 homes. But for two survivors, Stephen, and his wife, Nanci, the tragedy continues.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Claude O.

Claude, a Montana native, was incredibly excited because he just got a great deal on a new pickup truck in Portland, Oregon. Claude was planning a one-way bus ride to collect his new truck, but Claude never got the chance to drive the truck off the lot.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Oneal S.

In mid-March, Oneal entered a nursing and rehabilitation home for help recovering from his recently fractured shoulder. His stay was only meant to be temporary, but it became fatal due to negligent care in the hands of the home.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Kira G.

8 out of 10 drugs are generics. Did you know it's almost impossible to sue even when a generic drug kills someone you love?

 
Real People. Real Stories
Howard S.

Howard thought he was going in for a routine hip replacement.  He had a plastic hip implanted 16 years prior with no problems.  He was given what his doctor called the “latest and greatest” in hip technology, a Smith and Nephew metal-on-metal hip.  Ten months after the surgery, his nightmare

 
Real People. Real Stories
Clinton B.

Clinton served in the Navy during World War II where he handled ammunition and encouraged people to buy war bonds. After his honorable discharge, he worked at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard where he assisted skilled tradesman.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Viola P.

Viola is a retired middle school secretary who spent her life caring for children and her family. She enjoyed traveling with her husband, caring for her son and attending her local church.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Adele C.

Col. Adele Connell served our country for 36 years in Texas, Alabama, Indiana, Germany and the Pentagon.

 
Real People. Real Stories
James B.

As a young man, James served in the Navy performing engine room maintenance. After his honorable discharge, James went to work as a machinist, technician and maintenance general at a rubber plant in Pennsylvania. 

 
Real People. Real Stories
Jocelyn D.

No legal rights despite the terrible facts of what happened.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Michael B.

A few cents fix could have prevented Michael’s burns.  But instead, Blitz USA put profits before safety.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Carlos S.

Carlos grew up in rural Georgia where he shared a one bedroom apartment with five other people. With the desire to serve his country, he turned down academic scholarships to the University of Georgia and Wofford College to enter the Navy.

 
Real People. Real Stories
David L.

David worked as an electrician’s mate in the U.S. Navy when he was younger. During a span of 20 years, he was repeatedly exposed to asbestos-covered equipment and materials aboard different vessels.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Ednar B.

As with so many American families, when Ednar’s dementia progressed, her care needs overwhelmed her family’s ability to meet those needs, so her family requested help from a local nursing home.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Joe D.

After leaving the army, Joe spent 20 years working for a local water company. Part of his job included working with cement pipes- exposing him to asbestos.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Gabe G.

Gabe took a generic form of Accutane called Claravis for mild acne.  He developed ulcerative colitis, a recognized possible side-effect from the drug causing an inflamed digestive tract and colon.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Horace C.

Horace was a veteran of World War II.

 
Real People. Real Stories
Olivia C.

Research has found that 440,000 Americans die every year from preventable medical errors each year. 

 

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