A Death Without Justice

Eight out of ten prescriptions are filled with a generic drug. Did you know it's almost impossible to hold the manufacturer accountable for failing to warn patients about side-effects–even when a generic drug kills someone you love?

Kira G. passed away after she began taking generic Darvocet. She was prescribed Darvocet for pain in advance of knee surgery to repair her ACL that she tore while working at her job in an orphanage. Kira was only 22 years old. 

Kira’s gracious and giving life was cut short on April 9th, 2009 when she passed away from acute cardiac failure. She had no previous history of heart conditions.

Kira graduated from the College of Mount St. Joseph located outside of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 2008 and planned on seeking a Master’s Degree in nursing in the upcoming fall. She was an avid reader, huge country music fan and member of a community bowling team. She never missed a family function and looked forward to starting a family of her own someday. 

Because Kira took the generic version of Darvocet, her family could not hold the generic drug manufacturer accountable for failing to warn Kira of the drug’s dangerous side effects. Like thousands of other Americans, they were denied justice.  

Why? Because generic drug manufacturers won a ruling before the U.S. Supreme Court saying they are not responsible for warning patients when they learn of a new and dangerous side effects.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is taking steps to help restore justice for generic drug victims and to ensure generic drug warning labels can be updated as quickly as possible by their manufacturers. 

Kira’s mom, Tammy, submitted a petition in support of these steps to the FDA in her honor and in the honor of every American harmed by a generic drug.